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Article

Outcome Expectancy and Success With Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions: The Case of Guided Imagery

Kristine L. Kwekkeboom
ONF 2001, 1125-1132 DOI:

Purpose/Objectives: To describe the role of outcome expectancy in the use of cognitive-behavioral interventions and to test three variables (history of imagery use, preferred coping style, and perceived credibility of the imagery provider) as predictors of outcome expectancy regarding guided imagery.

Design: Secondary analysis using a descriptive, correlational design.

Setting: Surgery clinics at a large, midwestern university hospital.

Sample: 75 women undergoing surgery for gynecologic or breast cancers.

Methods: Data were collected as part of an ongoing trial of guided imagery. Participants completed measures of outcome expectancy and predictor variables at a preoperative clinic visit.

Main Research Variables: Outcome expectancy regarding a guided imagery intervention, previous history with imagery, preferred coping style, and perceived credibility of the imagery provider.

Findings: Significant relationships were demonstrated between previous history of imagery use and outcome expectancy (r = 0.47, p < 0.01) and between perceived credibility of the imagery provider and outcome expectancy (r = 0.45, p < 0.05). Preferred coping style was not related to outcome expectancy in this sample. Psychometric properties of new instruments were satisfactory.

Conclusions: Previous history of imagery use and perceived credibility of the imagery provider were supported as predictors of outcome expectancy. Future research will be necessary to reexamine the predictive role of preferred coping style.

Implications for Nursing Practice: Nurses should be aware of the potential role of outcome expectancy in effectiveness of nursing interventions. Patients' previous use of cognitive-behavioral interventions and perceptions of credibility may be helpful in selecting appropriate strategies.

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